Tuesday, April 13, 2021
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    Things developers love to hate

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    Here we listed some things developer love to hate.

    Poor QA

    Developers frame code; QA breaks the code. It’s not solid to see where the combat originates. Imagine being five years old, you’ve just flawless the Mona Lisa of board block towers, and here comes your jerk of a new sibling. They show the QA tester in this delusion, who rams into your pillar at full speed, ruining the masterpiece you’ve spent the last 20 minutes carefully crafting. Do you understand? That’s the kind of agony that QA can bring about.

    Maybe that’s overdramatic, but there’s no refuse that truly bad QA can be extremely annoying and waste significant time. The worst testers will:

    • Create bug information for issues that begin by their own unique environment
    • Prioritize every bug as a problem Robotically follow scripts and get stuck on non-issues while away real issues
    • Focus on minutiae while dominant issues remain untested
    • Leave out key information in bug picture

    “Just one more thing”

    I know we’re no great in the age of waterfall where every simple thing is projected before coding starts and nobody can change, but a load of add-ons for software profit is getting ridiculous. I’m talking about the confused or last-minute claim, incomplete or away user stories and feature creep.

    “Just one more thing”
    “Just one more thing”

    Tom Cargill’s quote is so true for many projects today. Teams ending the core work on a program project, and once crowd actually start using it, the constant requests come in. “Oooh, now let’s make this trait do this!” “I hate this article that I fought so hard for in the requirements stage. Why did we build it?

    Bad bosses

    Bad bosses
    Bad bosses

    Pointy-haired bosses are real. Some of us have processed for them. They’re the bosses who think that as they know a scat bit about a lot of things, they are an artist in everything (especially UI design). They make the guess that makes no impression and has zero bases in reality. These assumptions can result in arbitrary organizational pressure on language, platform, libraries, and other technology choices. Everyone accept that being a manager is tough, but some don’t follow basic principles that could make all a lot cheerful and more motivated.

    Everything is a top priority

    Everything is top priority
    Everything is top priority

    Some people forget what the word prioritize means. It means ranking burden and projects—in no risky terms—for your developers. But many of the bad illustration of managers, like the ones illustrated in the last section, are too nervous to choose. They guess that if they set up one task over another, the junior priority task won’t get done on time (reality check—sure, sometimes it won’t). It’s zip more than wishful thinking. They’ll say that child can just work on multiple things “in parallel,” as if saying this unusually gives them the ability to code two things simultaneously.

    Often, managers will add new “top-priority” tasks to the developers’ serving and still expect other ongoing tasks to be finished on time. “Why did we forget about this task?” they’ll ask. Few people think of the entity behind adding tasks or habit, which is that something uses to be tabled or removed permanently from your day in order to make room for the new work.

    Interruptions

    Interruptions
    Interruptions

    Developer
    Developer

    Developers don’t wear television because they enjoy music more than other people. They do it to shut out distracting noise and to prohibit interruptions. It’s in lieu of enjoying a sign on the back of their head that says, “LEAVE ME ALONE! I’M CODING!”

    Interruptions are adverse for all knowledge workers, but they are especially bad for programmers because of the mental models they want to maintain. This cartoon explains it better than I ever could.

    Studies show that it takes about 25 minutes to get direct again after being interrupted. So just remember that the next time you consider interrupting a builder when they’re clearly in The Zone™. You’re wasting about 15 to 30 minutes of their time an extension to the time you spend talking to them.

    Thankfully, there’s hope in some of these approaches to dealing with interruptions while coding.

    programmers-are-easily-scared
    programmers-are-easily-scared

    Meetings

    By now you’ve noticed that a lot of these items are not limited to software engineers. So if these affairs are annoying to the rest of the world, then why aren’t they clutching fixed? We may never know.

    Meetings
    Meetings

    Maybe we should have a meeting about it? When should we have a meeting? Let’s schedule a meeting to discuss that? This indeed happens. It’s not an untruth.

    Too many meetings or inefficiently run meetings are just as damaging to productivity as interruptions (probably more so in many cases). You’ve doubtless encountered all of these meetings:

    • The meeting that could have taken 10 minutes, but took an hour
    • The meeting that could have been recouped with an email
    • The meeting without a clear objective or timetable The meeting where people keep bringing up new topics and extending the length
    • The unnecessary more vision meeting

    Technology churn

    Churn is what developed when the heavy of the developers in a particular language ecosystem designate one structure or platform as the best and form a vibrant community around it, and then one or two years later the majority of developers decide that a new framework or platform is the best. They then all shift to that community, leaving behind other developers who tied their software more firmly to the first automation.

    Technology churn
    Technology churn

    The JavaScript and Node.js ecosystems are prime cases of this computers churn. “Flavor-of-the-week.js” some call it. It can be extremely stressful for developers—even the most engaged ones—to keep up with the churn of tools and APIs, which can need major changes to their applications.

    Documentation

    As I mentioned in the last point, documentation is crucial for a future bearing of developers who will have to preserve your code. But there are two different perspectives:

    1. Developers hate writing documentation
    2. Developers hate badly written documentation

    Documentation
    Documentation

    It looks like we’re at a standstill. Nothing is worse for developers who are trying to learn about some platform, library, framework, or piece of code than complex, badly organized, or outdated documentation. Unsurprisingly, documentation is written with hurry or, lose the “s”—with HATE) will doubtless turn out bad. So what’s the solution?

    Teams need to nurture a coupon author. It could be a developer who’s better at writing than the rest.

    Recruiters

    Recruiters
    Recruiters

    The scarcity of developers has finished the field of software engineering very lucrative. Jobs are plentiful.

    It’s nice to be desired in the medium of this tech boom, but a load of recruiting going on there has gone too far. At this point, I get emails for elder Rails developer positions because I built a simple site back in 2013. They almost never take a wide look at candidates or pay attention to their desires. It’s all about speed and quantity.

    The worst recruiters have no skills other than the strength to send an email and make a phone call. They would call James Gosling and ask him if he’s attentive in their senior Java engineer position and be completely serious (and also oblivious). This is why veteran developers who don’t need to hunt for jobs anymore have to put “no recruiters” in all caps on their LinkedIn profile or delete their profile altogether. It’s almost as bad as deal-making calls before we passed laws to curtail them.

    Stereotypes

    This is what most of the world thinks developers do:

    It just manufactures me want to cry. Partly because it’s so funny, but also as it’s so sad.

    Being a reflection of as a conjure by the natural population is a grace and a curse. The curse is that official think you can code everything, and most of your family just describe your job as “something to do with computers.” Or worse, they ask you if you can hack the neighbor’s Wi-Fi, and when you say, “It depends on,” they say, “Either you can save it or you can’t!”

    Requests for tech support

    This is closely associated with the last point, and it’s something coder have to deal with from family members and at the office.

    Requests for tech support
    Requests for tech support

    Dad: “Hey, you work with the abacus, right? Come to help me fix my iPad!”

    Your boss: “Hey, the printer’s defective again. Can you fix it?”

    See more:

    Android Code Editor Apps for Developers

    Best Code Playgrounds for Developers

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